A glorious tribute to the vanity of man
Ramblings of a history student
A blog dedicated to history, where you will find a good mix of everything I find interesting.
My obsessions include: Europe 1740-1815, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Napoleonic wars, The Age of Enlightenment and the age of sail.
Jul

I have a new silk fan, I’ve rubbed my face in with a bees wax salve, used lots of rose water, and is generally feeling historical ^^ The only thing missing is a dress, some neat shoes, and hair/face powder

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Jul

deaneggsandsam:

when u sneeze in front of your pet and they look like you’ve just offended their great ancestors

image

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Jul

ivvvoo:

Stormy North - Sangobeg Beach, Durness, Scotland by (fresch-energy)

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Jul

dogsenthusiast:

introducing yourself to people likeimage

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Jul

verecunda:

nauticalphasmid:

I JUST LOVE FORE-AND-AFT BICORNS SO MUCH

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Jul

minutemanworld:

I do so love seeing dirty and tattered uniforms on reenactors. These reenactors are at Colonial Williamsburg reenacting the Battle of Yorktown.

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Jul

minutemanworld:

35th Regiment of Foot detail. Belt plate, button, gorget.

Royal Sussex Regimental Society

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Jul

eighteenthcenturyfiction:

rococo2earlymodern:

Pair of shoes

  • Place of origin: Great Britain, United Kingdom (made)
  • Date: ca. 1740s (made)
  • Materials and Techniques: silk damask

The V&A Museum

Buckle!

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Jul

cimmerianweathers:

Portrait of Joseph Brant, George Romney, 1776. Oil on canvas.

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Jul

bobilerorg:

alternatif urun tasarimlari (thearchivist yapti) http://ift.tt/1b3Edhj

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Jul

victoriousvocabulary:

CREANCER

[noun]

1. a guardian; a person who protects or defends something.

2. tutor; mentor.

3. Obsolete: a creditor.

Etymology: from Anglo-Norman creanceour, Old French creanceor, from creancer.

[Thomas Blackshear - The Watcher]

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